Ward 11

Robert Dickinson

Website: robertdickinson.ca

Facebook: RobertDickinsonAB 

Twitter: @robdickinsonAB

Instagram: @robdickinsonAB

Q. Which Library do you use the most?

A. Southwood Library

Q. In your view, how does Calgary Public Library strengthen your ward?

A. The library is an important resource for all ages. Aside from providing residents with access to books (free), the library is a valuable meeting place with a wide array of programming that brings people together. The library allows many people access to computers and internet which is important for job searching, career planning as well as accessing information and services. Libraries partner with local schools to encourage reading and literacy in our youth. I know many young families who have also enjoyed events and activities with their preschool children. Libraries have an array of programs for newcomers to Calgary, including ESL resources. In addition, I think the library is critical for seniors, providing social connections and activities that allow them to engage with their peers and neighbours.

Libraries bring value to Calgarians at all stages of life and are important to the fabric of our neighbourhoods.

Q. What is your earliest library memory, or, tell us about an experience you’ve had at Calgary Public Library that made a positive difference to you.

A. When I first moved to Calgary from Bermuda when I was almost eight, I remember regularly walking (or occasionally bussing) from Inglewood to the downtown library with my mother. It was exciting to both be in the heart of a new city and to go to the library to choose books to take out. For a young child in a different country, going to the library it seemed like an adventure every time – it was a fun destination. I loved having all the book choices as I was an avid reader. As I got older, I would make the trek myself on my bicycle, checking out as many Hardy Boys books as I could carry back home.

Q. What is your favourite program or resource at Calgary Public Library?  

A. When my kids were small, I liked the fact my local library had toddler/preschool activities just a short walk away from home. It was a good opportunity for parents like me to get out of the house and connect with others with young children in the area. For families like ours it was a free, kid-friendly destination – it was fun to take the kids to check out books as well.

Currently, I enjoy the various school related partnerships the library has – I know my children enjoy going to the library with their classmates and I think it’s important that literacy and reading is encouraged.

Q. What are you reading now? What’s one book you would recommend others read, and why?

A. I am currently reading a book with my kids called “What’s the Big Secret”, to teach them in an age appropriate way about sexual education.

My favourite book is Brave New World by Aldous Huxley. I first read it over 20 years ago and it has always stood out to me as being an interesting read – very thought provoking.

Q. What musical instrument would you be most likely to borrow from our musical instrument lending library, and why? (We have banjos, drums, guitars, keyboards, ukuleles, violas, violins, and xylophones.)

A. My kids (9 and 7) are recently quite interested in learning to play various instruments – however they each have a long list of ones they want to learn. I think the musical instrument lending library is a fantastic resource as it will allow them to try out different types of instruments to get an idea of what they might like to learn first, without the costly commitment of buying something they may not enjoy. My youngest has his sights set on trying the ukulele first!

Janet Eremenko 

Website: janeteremenko.ca

Facebook: @JanetEremenko

Twitter: @JanetEremenko

Q. Which Library do you use the most?

A. Signal Hill Library

Q. In your view, how does Calgary Public Library strengthen your ward?

A. The three libraries in Ward 11 are really diverse.  Memorial Park is small, intimate and located in a beautiful heritage building.  Fish Creek is open and modern, and Southwood is a wonderful balance of the two. They are an invaluable asset to the ward; providing study and meeting space, play areas for kids, and exceptional, helpful staff.  They provide more than books; diverse programming,  education, and volunteer opportunities.  Libraries also serve as a draw for other community activities, engagement, and outreach.

Q. What is your earliest library memory, or, tell us about an experience you’ve had at Calgary Public Library that made a positive difference to you.

A. I grew up a block from Southwood Library.  As a latch-key kid, I would have some time alone after getting home from school before my siblings and my mom; so, as a big reader,I would walk down to the Library and bury my nose in a book for an hour or two.  They had big hard copy atlases that I would pore over and  I remember feeling very welcome there.

Q. What is your favourite program or resource at Calgary Public Library?  

A. As a mom to two young daughters, I love the children’s programming.  Story time was always very popular when they were little, and the new play area at Fish Creek has been a wonderful addition, particularly in the way that  parents engage at the library. 

As an advocate for low-income Calgarians, I value the library for the resources and information it provides to people who depend on its services.  For many Calgarians, the library is their only source for internet, research, news sources and educational programming.  I have participated in the annual Law Connect event in the past and it brings tremendous value to those who attend.

Q. What are you reading now? What’s one book you would recommend others read, and why?

A. 419” by Will Ferguson.  This Calgary-based author has packed a lot into this novel.  At its heart, I think its about globalization and scarcity, linking West Africa to Calgary.

I love books that capture the Canadian prairie (I spent a lot of family holidays east of the Cypress Hills). “The Stone Angel” by Margaret Laurence and “Who Has Seen the Wind” by W.O. Mitchell are two favourites.  However, time to read is scarce these days.  When I need a laugh, I pick up “Hark! A Vagrant” by Kate Beaton.

Q. What musical instrument would you be most likely to borrow from our musical instrument lending library, and why? (We have banjos, drums, guitars, keyboards, ukuleles, violas, violins, and xylophones.)

A. A keyboard.  I can play a very mediocre guitar, but have always wanted to learn how to play the piano.

 

Jeromy Farkas 

Website: jeromy.ca

Facebook: @JeromyYYC

Twitter: @JeromyYYC

Q. Which Library do you use the most?

A. Southwood Library

Q. In your view, how does Calgary Public Library strengthen your ward?

A. The Calgary Public Library strengthens Ward 11 by connecting people with their community, new ideas, and one other. Literacy and education are the basis of opportunity and being able to set your own course in life. In our rapidly changing world, individuals must now constantly learn new skills in order to keep up.

Q. What is your earliest library memory, or, tell us about an experience you’ve had at Calgary Public Library that made a positive difference to you.

A. As a child I took swimming lessons at the Village Square Leisure Centre, and afterwards would always stop at the attached library. To this day, visiting a library instills a nostalgic sense of adventure in both body and mind. The first book I remember checking out was about the adventures of Robinson Crusoe.

Q. What is your favourite program or resource at Calgary Public Library?  

A. I’m pleased to see the CPL’s role evolve to match Calgarians’ changing needs. As a first-generation Canadian who has worked in English as a Second Language teaching roles, the programming for refugees and newcomers resonate with me the most.

Q. What are you reading now? What’s one book you would recommend others read, and why?

A. I’m currently reading Andy Marshall’s “Thin Power,” a biography of former mayor Rod Sykes. I’ve had the good fortune to get to know Mayor Sykes since knocking on his door in Ward 11. As Mayor, he had a penchant for speaking up when others wouldn’t. He is known as a stickler for details but had the vision and ability to lay the groundwork for big plans like constructing the convention centre and LRT. I enjoy learning about where we have been so that we can make better decisions for the future.

Q. What musical instrument would you be most likely to borrow from our musical instrument lending library, and why? (We have banjos, drums, guitars, keyboards, ukuleles, violas, violins, and xylophones.)

A. Drums – they are a great stress relief for high-energy people!

 

Linda Johnson 

Website: lindajohnson.ca

Facebook: @lindajohnsonyyc

Twitter: @lindajohnsonyyc

Instagram: @lindajohnsonyyc

Q. Which Library do you use the most?

A. Southwood Library

Q. In your view, how does Calgary Public Library strengthen your ward?

A. Having 3 branches in one ward is tremendous – Southwood, Fish Creek and Memorial Park – each with its own atmosphere. Allowing residents to relax, work and connect close to home in a barrier free environment.

Q. What is your earliest library memory, or, tell us about an experience you’ve had at Calgary Public Library that made a positive difference to you.

A. I moved to Calgary in 1979 and during my first week visited the Main Branch to check out books on Calgary’s history. At the checkout I was unable to borrow the books since I did not have Calgary identification to get a library card. The lady behind me in line offered to check the books out on her card. The librarian warned the patron that if the books were not returned she would be responsible for them. The lady replied ‘I will take a chance and said to me Welcome to Calgary’.  I say again thank you to the patron and yes I did return the books on time.

Q. What is your favourite program or resource at Calgary Public Library?  

A. I like being welcomed as a friend no matter what branch I visit or why I am there. I especially like the Staff Picks. When my family was younger we liked the recorded book tapes – we still talk about The Great Ghost Rescue by Eva Ibbotson – a story of family, teamwork and even politics.

Q. What are you reading now? What’s one book you would recommend others read, and why?

A. I just finished No Relation by Terry Fallis – all of Fallis’ books are entertaining with interesting characters.

My one recommendation – Lois Hole Speaks Words that Matter – this book is a collection of speeches the former Lieutenant-Governor – gave. The book is a history of Alberta told from a very personal and unique perspective.

Q. What musical instrument would you be most likely to borrow from our musical instrument lending library, and why? (We have banjos, drums, guitars, keyboards, ukuleles, violas, violins, and xylophones.)

A. A keyboard 

 

Keith Simmons 

Website: worksforcalgary.ca

Facebook: @SimmonsWard11

Twitter: @_KeithSimmons

Q. Which Library do you use the most?

A. Fish Creek Library

Q. In your view, how does Calgary Public Library strengthen your ward?

A. The Public Library is about augmenting knowledge – being able to find out more about what you want to know. Being able to get a read on or get some help about finding out about something gives us the opportunity to better ourselves.

Q. What is your earliest library memory, or, tell us about an experience you’ve had at Calgary Public Library that made a positive difference to you.

A. I remember the Bookmobile. How cool is that!, a bus full of books! (I’m glad it’s back)

Q. What is your favourite program or resource at Calgary Public Library?  

A. Being able to get space for groups to have meetings. It’s tough when your group evolves beyond the kitchen table or the pub, but you can’t really afford meeting space – the Library is there for you!

Q. What are you reading now? What’s one book you would recommend others read, and why?

A. I wish!

Someone had suggested I read “The Underachievers Manifesto” by Ray Bennett, sounds like some good direction around unloading some stressors.

Q. What musical instrument would you be most likely to borrow from our musical instrument lending library, and why? (We have banjos, drums, guitars, keyboards, ukuleles, violas, violins, and xylophones.)

A. Bass – haven’t played since high school (but then I’ve a book to read first!)

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