Ward 4

Blair Berdusco

Website: BlairBerdusco.ca 

Facebook: @BlairBerdusco

Twitter: @BlairBerdusco

Instagram: @BlairBerdusco

Which Library do you use the most? Judith Umbach, Nose Hill and Downtown

Q. In your view, how does Calgary Public Library strengthen your ward?

A. Calgary Public Library strengthens ward 4, our communities and our residents through the thoughtful programs it provides. Not only can you access fun and exciting worlds which stimulate your mind and learn more about fascinating people, you have access to resources from resume and interview skills to retirement planning. Calgary Public Libraries are a valuable asset in the lives of Calgarians.

Calgary has seen a difficult couple of years with the economic downturn causing many people, including myself, to lose employment. The resources available at Calgary Public Libraries to aid Calgarians in updating resumes, changing career paths or if they’re just in need of a confidence boost regarding the skills they already possess, are fantastic.

My brother and sister-in-law have taken advantage of programs for young families. My niece has come away with excellent social skills and as a two-year-old, she is impressive in her speech and ability to form full sentences. She is basically a parrot right now and I attribute some of that to the programs she enjoys at the library.

From introducing kids to coding, an extremely useful knowledge in today’s tech focused job market, to the locked room style events, the Calgary Public Library is a wonderful and accessible community hub.

Q. What is your earliest library memory, or, tell us about an experience you’ve had at Calgary Public Library that made a positive difference to you.

A. I remember babysitters taking us to the Southwood Library every week. We would spend a couple of hours looking for books, reading and exploring. We would each get to take three books home. It became a weekly adventure for us.

We started learning the Dewey decimal system and I was so proud when I started school and already knew how to find books.

When my family moved to the brand new community, at the time, of Coventry Hills, we did not have a library nearby and convenient. I continued to use the library at school and always went for the book The One in the Middle is the Green Kangaroo because it was a quick and easy read and I still received the credit for our reading time.

I have loved reading my entire life. It was a useful skill during my education and continues to be in my personal and professional lives.

Q. What is your favourite program or resource at Calgary Public Library?  

A. I enjoy using the library as a meeting space, either in a designated room or just in an area with comfy seating. The Idea Lab at the Central Library has proven very useful for several meetings I have attended. The resources available in that room alone provide excellent tools for conversation and brainstorming.

I really appreciate the access to the internet and printing as it is a resource for many Calgarians and provides access to an opportunity many may not otherwise have. Investments in technology, providing access, is often more important than many of us realize. I have met many Calgarians who do not have computers or internet access in their homes. The world is moving more and more toward technology and even during elections, when most candidates focus on the online aspects of their campaigns, the library removes a barrier to information.

Q. What are you reading now? What’s one book you would recommend others read, and why?

A. I just finished Al Franken’s new book Giant of The Senate. It is fantastic, very informative and reminds me to have fun with my pursuit to be the advocate for ward 4.

One book I recommend others read is Sophie’s World by Jostein Gaarder. I found it to be a surprising book. It is heavy in its content, but very educational in an exciting way. The mystery in the story alongside the discussion of world philosophies was enthralling and fun.

Q. What musical instrument would you be most likely to borrow from our musical instrument lending library, and why? (We have banjos, drums, guitars, keyboards, ukuleles, violas, violins, and xylophones.)

A. I used to play the baritone so how about a baritone.

Srini Ganti

Website:  sgantiyyc.com

Twitter: @Srini_Ganti

Facebook@GantiSrini

Q. In your view, how does Calgary Public Library strengthen your ward?

A. Encouraging greater levels of civic engagement by inculcating the habit of reading on a wide variety of subjects.

Q. What is your earliest library memory, or, tell us about an experience you’ve had at Calgary Public Library that made a positive difference to you.

A. Every visit to the crowfoot library is very invigorating for me, the dazzling choice of reading materials, makes me come alive.

Q. What is your favourite program or resource at Calgary Public Library?  

A. Press Reader.

Q. What are you reading now? What’s one book you would recommend others read, and why?

A. I suggest reading all 4 titles as these books have a new take on the role of government and cities particularly important in current times.

Q. What musical instrument would you be most likely to borrow from our musical instrument lending library, and why? (We have banjos, drums, guitars, keyboards, ukuleles, violas, violins, and xylophones.)

A. Keyboards, guitars.

Greg Miller

Website: gregmilleryyc.ca

Facebook: @GregMillerYYC

Twitter: @GregGinYYC

Instagram: @GregGinYYC

Which Library do you use the most? 

Downtown and the Judith Umbach branches, although my photo was taken in the Nose Hill branch. I was fortunate enough to get a tour of the materials sorting system in the back, which really appealed to the geek in me!

Q. In your view, how does Calgary Public Library strengthen your ward?

In Ward 4 we have two precious branches, Judith Umbach and Nose Hill, which are heavily used. They are places to share and connect. There’s something for everyone, from the very young to the very old and everyone in between. Libraries form a critical part of our public infrastructure, along with our parks and our community centres.

Our understanding of the role of libraries has grown. Today the CPL means more than just information resources like books and internet access. Our branches offer places for our residents to study, to meet, to take a class or to find a peaceful moment that sometimes can’t be found at home. Our libraries bring together and support our communities.

Q. What is your earliest library memory, or, tell us about an experience you’ve had at Calgary Public Library that made a positive difference to you.

A. Growing up in St. Albert, I’ll never forget how busy our local library was. My parents to this day have been avid readers, and I especially remember my mother taking me as a young child to browse and borrow some books every couple of weeks. It was a great way to find whole new worlds beyond our town.

My childhood library experience helped build a life-long passion for reading, which has been invaluable.

Q. What is your favourite program or resource at Calgary Public Library?  

A. Rarely have I entered a Calgary library branch that wasn’t full of life. People come together to connect and to learn. There always seems to be a program of some kind going on at the Judith Umbach branch, from ESL sessions to Career workshops to just fun stuff. I’m amazed at how each meeting room always looks filled. The value of our libraries as gathering places can’t be underestimated.

I’ve enjoyed many a discussion or film at the John Dutton Theatre downtown. We could use a resource like that in Ward 4.

Q. What are you reading now? What’s one book you would recommend others read, and why?

A. I have a passion for history, and I recently read The Arsenal of Democracy by A J. Baime. It’s an incredible story about the production of the B-24 bomber in World War II, and Henry Ford’s determination to build an aircraft an hour. Beyond the technical challenges they faced, the book is full of corporate and family intrigue, politics, and the social impact of constructing a town out of nowhere to house thousands of factory workers.

Animal Farm by George Orwell had a big influence on me. I was fascinated by Orwell’s use of a farm setting to tell the story of the Russian Revolution. I remember thinking as a kid how unfair it all seemed. Of course I’ll never forget Hockey Stars of 1972 by Stan Fischler. Phil Esposito was on the cover!

Q. What musical instrument would you be most likely to borrow from our musical instrument lending library, and why? (We have banjos, drums, guitars, keyboards, ukuleles, violas, violins, and xylophones.)

A. I don’t play a musical instrument so I have to go with ukulele. It’s pretty cool to find two u’s, two e’s, and two l’s in a word that only has seven letters!

Sean Chu

Website:  seanchu.ca

Twitter: @seanchucalgary

Facebook@seanchucalgary

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