It started as a one-time, two day party. The rest is Stampede history.

Every July, Calgary sees a massive influx of people clad in cowboy hats and boots, oversized belt buckles, and, yes, bolo ties. They’re here for the Calgary Stampede, an annual 10-day shindig that typically draws more than one million people to the Stampede grounds in Victoria Park. In fact, the event temporarily transforms the entire…
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Happy 106th City Hall!

Calgary’s old City Hall is currently undergoing a massive rehabilitation. The 106-year-old storied sandstone building is shrouded behind scaffolding and a protective enclosure, covered with an image of the original City Hall. That building was officially opened June 26, 1911 by Sir Robert Borden, the leader of the federal opposition party, who became prime minister…
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Few Alberta towns were actually dry during prohibition, much to the dismay of the “Drys”.

Contrary to legend, prohibition was not dropped on an unsuspecting public by fuddy-duddy women who had recently been given the vote. The campaign for a "Dry Alberta" was led by women and men as a response to the rampant public drunkenness and domestic abuse of the time. Women’s groups like the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union moved to ban…
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From garbage dump to Historic Resource: Discover the history of some Calgary icons as they celebrate their 50th

They may be popular now, but some of Calgary’s iconic Centennial attractions had less than glamorous beginnings. No matter how they got their start, they join the ranks of thousands of buildings and monuments across the nation that were created in 1967 to mark the 100th anniversary of Confederation. Confederation Park: Garbage Dump No More Once…
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This is what “taking the train home” looked like 110 years ago…

For its first 25 years, Calgary was a compact, walkable city with only hotel buses and privately owned horse-drawn carriage fleets ferrying people to and fro. As the population increased— from 3,500 in 1889 to nearly 44,000 in 1911—so did the political will and public desire for a public transit system. Calgary’s rough roadways were…
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Sarcee Camp sprang up outside Calgary in spring 1915, as the world prepared for the Great War.

A first-time visitor to the community of Signal Hill is often struck by the sight of the huge numbers adorning the hill. The giant 137, 113, 151, and 51 are composed of white-washed rocks, representing some the battalions who trained at Sarcee Camp starting in 1915, as Calgary, and the world, prepared for the Great…
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