Think Big at Central Library

Friday, March 24, 2017

As Canada blazes its way to be one of the first countries to legalize cannabis for recreational use, it’s more important than ever to understand the science: how does cannabis affect the brain and what does this mean for public health?

 

Speakers

Image of Dr Rebecca Haines SaahDr. Rebecca Haines-Saah is a member of the O’Brien Institute for Public Health and The Mathison Centre for Mental Health Research & Education at the University of Calgary. She is a health sociologist and public health researcher with a PhD in Behavioural Health Sciences and Addiction Studies from the University of Toronto. She co-leads the Teens Reporting Adolescent Cannabis Experiences Project (TRACE), which is a study of frequent cannabis use among teens that began at the University of British Columbia in 2006. Her interest in engaging the perspectives of youth in mental health and substance use research was inspired by her work as a member of the original cast of the television series Degrassi High in the 1980s.


Image of Dr Matt HillDr. Matthew Hill
is a member of the Hotchkiss Brain Institute and The Mathison Centre for Mental Health Research & Education at the University of Calgary. Dr. Hill’s research focuses on the role of the endocannabinoid system. Dr. Hill has been involved in studies examining endocannabinoid function in psychiatric conditions (depression, PTSD) and put forth the hypothesis that deficient endocannabinoid signaling may predispose an individual to stress-related psychiatric conditions. On the education front, Hill has designed a new graduate course on the neurobiology of mental illness which is open to neuroscience and psychology graduate students, as well as psychiatric residents, and focuses on both basic and clinical sciences and neurobiological theories of major psychiatric conditions and the mechanisms of action of psychotherapeutic agents.

Jay Ingram is a Canadian science writer/ broadcaster. He has hosted two national science programs in Canada, Quirks and Quarks on CBC radio and Daily Planet on Discovery Channel Canada. He has written 13 books, which have been translated into 14 languages, has five honorary degrees and is a member of the Order of Canada.

 


 

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Friday, September 30, 2016

When a neurological disorder compromises your ability to move, can you turn it around, and use your body to re-train your brain? Think Big host Jay Ingram, with experts from the Hotchkiss Brain Institute at the University of Calgary, discussed different approaches to rehabilitation — from dance to robotic therapies.

Speakers

Anne FlynnImage of Anne Flynn is a Professor Emerita (Dance) in the Faculty of Kinesiology, and a member of the Hotchkiss Brain Institute.  Her research on Canadian women in dance, multiculturalism and performance, and dance in health promotion and education has been presented and published internationally. She is currently co-investigator on a national Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council partnership project on Arts for Social Change, collaborating on research programs on dance for senior citizens, and for people with Parkinson disease. Flynn is serving as President of the U.S. based Congress on Research in Dance.

 

Dr. Sean DukelowImage of Sean Dukelow is a clinician-scientist at the University of Calgary and Foothills Medical Centre, and a member of the Hotchkiss Brain Institute. The main focus of Dr. Dukelow's research involves understanding the mechanisms of stroke and traumatic brain injury recovery and facilitating stroke rehabilitation through the use of technology. Dukelow currently serves as Research Director for the Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation's resident training program, in the Department of Clinical Neurosciences at the Cumming School of Medicine.

 

Jay IngramImage of Jay Ingram is a Canadian science writer/ broadcaster. He has hosted two national science programs in Canada, Quirks and Quarks on CBC radio and Daily Planet on Discovery Channel Canada. He has written 13 books, which have been translated into 14 languages, has five honorary degrees and is a member of the Order of Canada.


Think Big

Friday, June 24, 2016

Why did I eat that entire bag of cookies? …. Fries with that? Uh …sure! We all strive to make good decisions — but sometimes our brains take control and hijack our choices. Think Big host Jay Ingram and brain experts from the Hotchkiss Brain Institute at the University of Calgary explored decision-making, motivation and addiction Friday, June 24, 2016.

 

Speakers

Image of Dr Vedran Lovic Dr. Vedran Lovic earned his doctorate degree at the University of Toronto working under the mentorship of Prof. Alison Fleming and in collaboration with Dr. Paul Fletcher (CAMH). During his first postdoctoral fellowship, he worked with Prof. Terry Robinson and Prof. Brandon Aragona (University of Michigan), studying dopamine neurotransmission in preclinical models of addiction. His second postdoctoral fellowship (Prof. Ann Graybiel’s laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology) was spent investigating functional neuroanatomy of the basal ganglia. His lab studies the neural mechanism of learning, motivation, and decision making processes in order to better understand the effects of early-life adversity and drug addiction.

Dr. Stephanie Borgland is an Associate Professor in the Hotchkiss Brain Institute at the Cumming School of Medicine at the University of Calgary. Her research focuses on understanding the neurobiological mechanisms of aberrant motivation related to addiction and obesity. The Borgland lab uses a combination of techniques to explore how areas of the brain involved in reward valuation and motivated behaviour are rewired by consumption of palatable foods, obesegenic diets or drugs of abuse. The laboratory has made exciting discoveries on how plasticity within the mesolimbic dopamine circuit is modulated by satiety-promoting peptides, including insulin and leptin and how palatable food can prime future food seeking.

Jay Ingram Profile Photo - SmallJay Ingram is a Canadian science writer/ broadcaster. He has hosted two national science programs in Canada, Quirks and Quarks on CBC radio and Daily Planet on Discovery Channel Canada. He has written 13 books, which have been translated into 14 languages, has five honorary degrees and is a member of the Order of Canada.


Think Big Alzheimer's

Friday, March 18, 2016

Jay Ingram and dementia experts from the Hotchkiss Brain Institute (Cumming School of Medicine, U of C) discussed the latest developments in the treatment and possible prevention of this devastating disease.

Think Big Eric SmithDr. Eric Smith is leader of the Dementia & Cognitive Disorders NeuroTeam at the University of Calgary. Dr. Smith investigates the risk factors and consequences of diseases of the cerebral microcirculation, including understanding the vascular contributions to cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease. Cerebral ischemic lesions frequently co-exist with Alzheimer’s disease in persons with mild cognitive impairment and dementia. His research seeks to identify neuroimaging markers of these pathologies to determine the relative impact of small vessel disease, parenchymal beta-amyloid (Alzheimer’s disease) and vascular beta-amyloid (cerebral amyloid angiopathy) on cognitive function and risk of dementia.

venturato_lorraineLorraine Venturato, PhD, is co-leader of the Dementia & Cognitive Disorders NeuroTeam at the University of Calgary. Dr. Venturato’s current research focuses on service delivery and workforce development, including the development and evaluation of innovative models of care and professional practice models for the delivery of care to older people. She is also engaged in translational research through action research and practice development in long-term care settings, and has funded projects that aim to bridge the gap between education, research and practice in care of older people. Her clinical research focuses on quality of life, quality of care and models of care for people living with dementia.


Think Big 2 Metal Meets Mental

November 13, 2015

It will boggle your mind to learn what neuroscientists can do with your brain. Jay Ingram and experts from the Hotchkiss Brain Institute, at the University of Calgary's Cumming School of Medicine, explored technologies that interface with the brain to understand and improve brain and mental health.

Image of Dr Zelma KissZelma Kiss, MD, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Neurosurgery in the Department of Clinical Neurosciences and member of the Hotchkiss Brain Institute in the Cumming School of Medicine at the University of Calgary. Dr. Kiss’ research interests have focused on the how deep brain stimulation (DBS) works and neural prostheses to restore function. Clinically, Dr. Kiss practices functional & stereotactic neurosurgery using neuromodulation to treat movement disorders, psychiatric disorders, and pain.

 


Grant GordonImage of Dr Grant Gordon, PhD, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Physiology and Pharmacology and member of the Hotchkiss Brain Institute in the Cumming School of Medicine at the University of Calgary. He holds a Canada Research Chair in Cellular Mechanisms of Brain Blood Flow Control. His laboratory uses two-photon fluorescence imaging, patch clamp electrophysiology and optogenetics to study how brain cells communicate with local blood vessels. By understanding the molecular mechanisms of this process, he hopes to discover new drug targets for neurological conditions associated with poor brain blood flow.


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May 22, 2015

The Amazing Brain & its Juggling Act — Life's a juggling act and the brain's on the ball.

Ever wondered why some people seem so on top of their game? How can they think so fast and be so sharp without much effort when you can't remember what you had for lunch?

Jay Ingram and experts from the Hotchkiss Brain Institute, in the University of Calgary's Cumming School of Medicine, dove into the amazing brain to uncover the science behind memory, Friday May 22 at the Central Library. See photos from the evening on Flickr. Check out Jay Ingram's favourite books on the brain and memory.

Jaideep Bains - Small2Jaideep Bains, PhD, is a Professor of Physiology and Pharmacology and member of the Hotchkiss Brain Institute in the Cumming School of Medicine at the University of Calgary. He is primarily interested in how the brain learns and remembers stress. His goal is to use these learning rules to decipher the underpinnings of stress-related disorders.


 

 

Cam Teskey - Small2G. Campbell Teskey, PhD, is a professor in the Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy and member of the Hotchkiss Brain Institute in the Cumming School of Medicine at the University of Calgary. His research programs focus on epilepsy and seizure disorders, stroke recovery and the cellular synaptic basis of learning & memory.

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