Think Big: Clearing the Smoke: Cannabis, the Brain & Public Health

Image of cannabis leaf with the words Think BigAs Canada blazes its way to be one of the first countries to legalize cannabis for recreational use, it’s more important than ever to understand the science: how does cannabis affect the brain and what does this mean for public health?

Join Think Big host Jay Ingram in an interactive discussion with experts from the Hotchkiss Brain Institute and The Mathison Centre for Mental Health Research & Education.

Friday, March 24, 2017
Doors: 6:00 p.m.
Talk: 6:30 p.m.
Reception: 7:30 p.m.
Central Library

RSVP ONLINE or call 403.260.2620 to register.
This adults-only event is FREE (but seating is limited).

Speakers

Image of Dr Rebecca Haines SaahDr. Rebecca Haines-Saah is a member of the O’Brien Institute for Public Health and The Mathison Centre for Mental Health Research & Education at the University of Calgary. She is a health sociologist and public health researcher with a PhD in Behavioural Health Sciences and Addiction Studies from the University of Toronto. She co-leads the Teens Reporting Adolescent Cannabis Experiences Project (TRACE), which is a study of frequent cannabis use among teens that began at the University of British Columbia in 2006. Her interest in engaging the perspectives of youth in mental health and substance use research was inspired by her work as a member of the original cast of the television series Degrassi High in the 1980s.


Image of Dr Matt HillDr. Matthew Hill
is a member of the Hotchkiss Brain Institute and The Mathison Centre for Mental Health Research & Education at the University of Calgary. Dr. Hill’s research focuses on the role of the endocannabinoid system. Dr. Hill has been involved in studies examining endocannabinoid function in psychiatric conditions (depression, PTSD) and put forth the hypothesis that deficient endocannabinoid signaling may predispose an individual to stress-related psychiatric conditions. On the education front, Hill has designed a new graduate course on the neurobiology of mental illness which is open to neuroscience and psychology graduate students, as well as psychiatric residents, and focuses on both basic and clinical sciences and neurobiological theories of major psychiatric conditions and the mechanisms of action of psychotherapeutic agents.

Jay Ingram is a Canadian science writer/ broadcaster. He has hosted two national science programs in Canada, Quirks and Quarks on CBC radio and Daily Planet on Discovery Channel Canada. He has written 13 books, which have been translated into 14 languages, has five honorary degrees and is a member of the Order of Canada.

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