All Library locations are temporarily closed. Curbside services and exterior return chutes remain open. More information at COVID-19 Updates
LOCATIONS

Fish Creek Library

Hours & Location

Fish Creek Library

Fish Creek Library

  • Sunday: 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM
  • Monday: 9:00 AM - 9:00 PM
  • Tuesday: 9:00 AM - 9:00 PM
  • Wednesday: 9:00 AM - 9:00 PM
  • Thursday: 9:00 AM - 9:00 PM
  • Friday: 9:00 AM - 6:00 PM
  • Saturday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
See Holidays & Closures +

Holidays & Closures

 

New Year's Day – January 1, 2021
Closed All Day

Family Day – February 15, 2021
Closed All Day

Good Friday — April 2, 2021
Closed All Day

Victoria Day — May 24, 2021
Closed All Day

Canada Day — July 1, 2021
Closed All Day

Heritage Day — August 2, 2021
Closed All Day

Labour Day — September 6, 2021
Closed All Day

Thanksgiving Day — October 11, 2021
Closed All Day

Remembrance Day — November 11, 2021
Closed All Day

Christmas Eve — December 24, 2021
Open until 5

Christmas Day — December 25, 2021
Closed All Day

Boxing Day — December 26, 2021
Closed All Day

New Years Eve — December 31, 2021
Closed All Day

 

11161 Bonaventure Drive SE
Calgary AB T2J 6S1

Centralized Info: (403) 260-2600

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Fish Creek Library is closed for in-person visits. Curbside Service and Curbside Printing will be available starting April 8. Please check curbside hours before visiting.

Features

  • Accessible

  • After-hours materials return

  • Children's space

  • Computers & Printers

  • Meeting Rooms

  • Parking

  • Study space

  • Teen Space

  • Free Wi-Fi

History of Fish Creek Library

Fish Creek Library opened June 1, 1985. This landmark “pyramid” library was built to replace the small Macleod location that opened in 1979 and had previously served the south end of the city. It was designed by architects Ian McDougall and Ken Hutchinson, who intended the design to resemble the Rocky Mountains. However, its iconic shape was frequently compared to a pyramid, and the nickname stuck.

Calgary Herald columnist Patrick Tivy described it as follows: “This impressive piece of oil-boom architecture is the closest thing in Alberta to a pharaoh’s tomb.” Responses like this proved that the location accomplished the Library’s mission of making a statement. By 1994, the location had the highest item circulation in the system.

Photo: Calgary Public Library Archives, Our Story in Pictures

FishCreekHistoricPhoto